Heart Attack Symptoms & Chest Pain Awareness 

Having Chest Pain & Symptoms? Call 911 – We'll bring Emergency Services to your home!Don't wait to get help if you experience any of these heart attack warning signs!  Although some heart attacks are sudden and intense, most start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort. Pay attention to your body -- and call 9-1-1 if you feel:

  • Chest discomfort. Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain.
  • Discomfort in other areas of the upper body. Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.
  • Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort.
  • Other signs:  cold sweat, nausea, lightheadedness, palpitations, paleness, weakness/fatigue, or dizziness. 

Heart attacks have beginnings. These beginnings occur in more than 50% of patients. Most importantly, if recognized in time, these “beginnings” can be treated before the heart is damaged!

Q: WHAT IS EHAC? 
A: Early Heart Attack Education


Early signs
Early signs and symptoms that can begin hours or days before a heart attack. You may or may not experience any or all of these symptoms. You may experience mild chest symptoms, such as pressure, burning, aching or tightness. These symptoms may come and go until finally becoming constant and severe.

  • Nausea
  • Pain that travels down one or both arms
  • Jaw pain
  • Fatigue
  • Anxiety
  • Chest pressure, squeezing or discomfort
  • Back pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Feeling of fullness
  • Sleep disturbances including bouts of insomnia or trouble either getting to sleep or staying asleep
  • Indigestion

DOWNLOAD OUR EHAC BROCHURE HERE 


Alarming Statistics

  • Heart disease causes approximately 1 of 4 deaths in the United States.
  • About 50% of sudden cardiac deaths occur outside a hospital. This suggests that many people don’t act on early warning signs.
  • Survey results show that only 27% of the respondents were aware of all major symptoms and knew to call 911.

Watch an animation of a heart attack from the American Heart Association.

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